Wednesday, December 8, 2010

The Brassie Sakasa Kebari


Brassie Sakasa Kebari
 Seeing that I have nothing inspirational to post about today I thought I would post about a kebari pattern that  I came up with this past summer.  When fished, most sakasa kebari flies that I have tied will float at the surface or within about 10 inches of the surface.  I wanted a sakasa kebari that would sink fairly fast when I had a chance to fish some fast water.  At the time I had no beads to use so I looked for ideas elsewhere.  Of all of the patterns I have looked through one in particular jumped to the front of the line.  Brassie's were developed out west for the same reason I needed one.  They sink well and have a great attraction to them and they have been found to work well in many other waters around the country.  So, like other sakasa kebari variations I have tied, I combined aspects of two flies to make one.  I didn't have the chance to use them on fast water this year. I tended to stick with my Royal Sakasa Kebari when I went looking for brookies (see Nov. post for "The Royal Family).  However, I did try the Brassie SK's at the millpond around the corner a few times.  I found that 4 out of 5 bluegills preferred the taste of this kebari to the others that I had tried with them.  I even picked up a few pumpkin seed's and small largemouth bass to boot.  I look forward to trying them on fast water like I intended but if worse comes to worse they will work on panfish.  On a side note, anyone interested in this type of sakasa kebari should checkout the Nov. 25th Thanksgiving "Tina Louise Kebari"  and Nov 21st post at http://www.troutrageous.blogspot.com/  . He has some great looking flies. In addition, Chris Stewart at http://www.tenkarabum.com/ has another version he calls "Sakasa Copperbari" that is a good looking fly.

Brassie Sakasa Kebari
Hook: Mustad C49S
Thread: Orvis thread tan 8/0
Hackle: Hungarian partridge
Body: peacock herl collar and UTC ulta small diameter copper wire

7 comments:

  1. Thanks for the nod. Like you brassie as well. The variety found in a simple tenkara-style pattern is amazing. I love how us Americans are bastardizing those traditional Japanese flies (in a good way).

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  2. A very basic, and simple pattern. But well tied.

    Nice work.

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  3. Thanks guys I appreciate it.

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  4. Great looking fly. I've been reading through your archives and love your sakasa kebari variations. Gives me inspiration for when I sit down to tie. I've been using this pattern (various colors) since I got into tenkara about 7 months ago and love it. Keep posting your flies!

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  5. Brandon, Thanks very much. I love to experiment with flies. I think the Sakasa Kebari are a great type of fly to do this with and they are easy to tie. Very few materials are needed to come up with quite a few variations. I have a lot more in waiting that I will eventually post.

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  6. I'm also curious, what size hook do you use?

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  7. Brandon, I generally use a size 12 C49S. Whether it's a 17" fish or a 5" one they all seem to hit the fly. Lately I have been tying some size 16 as well. I try and keep it simple.

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